Autodesk, Inc. | Ceiling Recycling Program

Project: Autodesk, Inc

Location: San Rafael, CA

Products: Ceiling Recycling Program

The Challenge:

Autodesk is a leading supplier of the 3D software used in the design of green buildings. As such, Pat Clover, Autodesk’s Sustainable Operations Manager, explains that “Sustainability is embedded in our corporate nature, both in terms of product development and company operations.” As evidence of the latter, the company has implemented a program to ensure its facilities operate as sustainable as possible.
 

The Solution:

To help meet its corporate goals, Autodesk began participating in the Armstrong Ceiling Recycling Program in 2009, and has recycled over 300,000 sq. ft. of ceiling tiles since then.

The program enables commercial building owners to send ceilings from renovation projects to the nearest Armstrong ceiling plant as an alternative to landfill disposal. The discarded ceilings are then used to manufacture new ceilings.

Clover notes that the closed loop process is one of the reasons Autodesk recycles old ceilings. “Using products high in recycled content is important to us,” he says. “As a result, when it comes to ceilings, we are both a generator and a consumer.”

A recent example of ceiling recycling at Autodesk occurred during the renovation of a third floor office space at its San Rafael, CA campus, when 10,000 sq. ft. of old ceiling tiles were recycled.

Ceiling tiles removed from a space are either stacked on a pallet and wrapped for delivery to an Armstrong plant, or dumped into a roll-off container and collected by an Armstrong Construction & Demolition Processor who will bale the tiles for delivery.

DPR Construction of San Francisco implemented the program at San Rafael for Autodesk. Mike Scott, DPR’s Construction Waste Management Coordinator, explains that the collection method was used at the facility.

“The amount of cut tiles and the accessibility of the floor did not lend itself well to palletizing,” he says. “Getting the tiles out on stacks would have been very difficult and challenging. The ability to simply throw the tiles into a container simplified the process greatly.”